Math Art

Math Base Course – Definition,Examples,Connection With Art & Worksheets

Have you ever wondered how computers store and process information? Or how cryptography works? Or even how to count on your fingers in different languages? The answer to all of these questions is math base.

Math bases are a way of representing numbers using a specific number of digits. The most common base is 10, which is why we call our number system the decimal system. In the decimal system, we use the digits 0 through 9 to represent numbers.

Other number systems use different bases. For example, the binary system uses base 2, which means that it uses only the digits 0 and 1. The hexadecimal system uses base 16, which means that it uses the digits 0 through 9, as well as the letters A through F.

Math bases are important because they allow us to represent a large range of numbers using a relatively small number of digits.

What is a base in math?Math base definition

A base in math is the number of digits that are used to represent numbers in a number system. The most common base is 10, which is why we call our number system the decimal system. In the decimal system, we use the digits 0 through 9 to represent numbers.

Other number systems use different bases. For example, the binary system uses base 2, which means that it uses only the digits 0 and 1. The hexadecimal system uses base 16, which means that it uses the digits 0 through 9, as well as the letters A through F.

The base of a number system is important because it determines how many different numbers can be represented in the system. For example, the binary system can only represent 2^n different numbers, where n is the number of digits in the number. The decimal system can represent 10^n different numbers, and the hexadecimal system can represent 16^n different numbers.

Bases are also used in other areas of mathematics, such as computer science and cryptography. For example, computers use the binary system to represent data, and cryptography uses the hexadecimal system to represent keys and other sensitive information.

Math base examples

Bellow are several examples of numbers in different bases:

Base Number Equivalent in base 10
2        1011 11
8        123 75
10        123 123
16        ABC 1711

The Zero and Decimal Numeration

a) The zero (absence, void) was a concept that was difficult for some civilizations to accept.

It took a long time before zero became a number and 0 a digit like the others…

…and before we arrived at positional notation as we know it.

 

b) The decimal system (or base 10) uses the 10 digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9.

Grouping is done by 10: with 10 units, you form a ten, with 10 tens, a hundred…

3,247 = 3 x 1,000 + 2 x 100 + 4 x 10 + 7 x 1 = 3 x 10^3 + 2 x 10^2 + 4 x 10^1 + 7 x 10^0

(a_0 = 1 if a_n is not zero)

12,009 = 1 x 10,000 + 2 x 1,000 + 0 x 100 + 0 x 10 + 9 x 1 = 1 x 10^4 + 2 x 10^3 + 0 x 10^2 + 0 x 10^1 + 9 x 10^0

Note: You can also group by 5, creating a base 5 system that uses 5 digits: 0, 1, 2, 3, 4.

In base 5, (in base 5) corresponds to 1 x 5^3 + 3 x 5^2 + 0 x 5^1 + 2 x 5^0 = 1 x 125 + 3 x 25 + 0 x 5 + 2 x 1 = 202 (in base 10).

The number written in base 5 is written as 202 in base 10.

You can also group by 2, 3, 4, 5, 6…

 

Binary Numeration (Base 2)

This is the numbering system used by computers.

All numbers are represented with the two symbols 0 and 1.

After 0 and 1, we have:

Base 10: 0 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10  Base 2: 0 1

Converting from base 2 to base 10:

(in base 2) = 1 x 2^3 + 1 x 2^2 + 0 x 2^1 + 1 x 2^0 = 8 + 4 + 0 + 1 = 13 (in base 10)

Converting from base 10 to base 2:

a) We can write the number as a sum of powers of 2.

23 (base 10): 23 = 16 + 4 + 2 + 1 = 1 x 2^4 + 0 x 2^3 + 1 x 2^2 + 1 x 2^1 + 1 x 2^0 = (in base 2)

 

b) We can also divide 23 by 2, quotient 11 and remainder 1.

Then we divide 11 by 2, quotient 5 and remainder 1. We divide 5 by 2, quotient 2 and remainder 1.

We divide 2 by 2, quotient 1, remainder 0.

Result: 1 0 1 1 1

Digits are drawings, symbols to represent numbers. A number can be written with one or more digits; it can be written in letters…

Four, 4, IV, and four are different ways to represent the same number.

1,245 is a four-digit number;

2 is the hundreds digit, 12 is the number of hundreds;

4 is the tens digit, 124 is the number of tens;

1 is the thousands digit, 1 is the number of thousands.

 

Interesting facts about math base

Math bases are the foundation of our number system, allowing us to represent numbers in a concise and efficient manner. However, there is more to math bases than meets the eye.

Bellow are some interesting facts about math bases that may surprise you:

  • The most common math base is 10, which is why we call our number system the decimal system. However, other math bases, such as 2 (binary), 8 (octal), and 16 (hexadecimal), are also widely used in computer science and other fields.
  • The base of a number system determines how many different numbers can be represented in the system. For example, the binary system can only represent 2^n different numbers, where n is the number of digits in the number. The decimal system can represent 10^n different numbers, and the hexadecimal system can represent 16^n different numbers.
  • Math bases also affect how numbers are added and multiplied. In the binary system, for example, 1 + 1 = 10 (two), and 1 × 1 = 1.
  • Math bases can be used to create different types of number systems. The balanced ternary system, for example, uses base 3, but instead of the digits 0, 1, and 2, it uses the digits -1, 0, and 1. This system is more efficient for storing numbers in computers than the binary system.
  • Math bases can also be used to generate different types of art and music. Some artists use math bases to create fractal patterns and other geometric designs. Some musicians use math bases to create music with unique rhythms and melodies.
  • The Fibonacci sequence can be used to generate different mathematical bases. For example, the first 12 Fibonacci numbers are 0, 1, 1, 2, 3, 5, 8, 13, 21, 34, 55, and 89. These numbers can be used to generate a base 12 number system, which is often used in mathematics and computer science.
  • The golden ratio can also be used to generate different mathematical bases. The golden ratio is a special number that is approximately equal to 1.618. It can be used to generate a base 1.618 number system, which is sometimes used in mathematics and computer science.
  • Mathematical bases can be used to create different types of art and music. For example, some artists use mathematical bases to create fractal patterns and other geometric designs. Some musicians use mathematical bases to create music with unique rhythms and melodies.

Applications of Mathematical Bases

Mathematical bases have a wide range of applications in the real world, including:

Computer science

Computers use the binary system (base 2) to store and process data. This is because the binary system is very efficient for computers, as it can be represented using only two states: on and off.

Cryptography

Cryptography is the study of how to protect information from unauthorized access. Many cryptographic algorithms use mathematical bases to generate and exchange keys. For example, the RSA cryptosystem uses the modular arithmetic of large numbers, which is based on the decimal system (base 10).

Networking

Computer networks use the hexadecimal system (base 16) to represent IP addresses. This is because the hexadecimal system is very efficient for representing large numbers in a concise way.

Finance

Financial institutions use the decimal system (base 10) to represent currency amounts. However, they also use other bases, such as the binary system and the hexadecimal system, to represent other financial data, such as stock prices and bond yields.

Chaos Theory and Nonlinear Dynamics

Chaos theory, rooted in advanced mathematical bases, helps us understand seemingly unpredictable systems. Weather patterns, stock markets, and even the fluttering of a butterfly’s wings can be modeled and understood through the lens of chaotic mathematics. This insight has applications in fields as diverse as meteorology and finance.

Engineering

Engineers use a variety of mathematical bases to design and build products. For example, electrical engineers use the binary system to design digital circuits, and mechanical engineers use the decimal system to design machine parts.

The Music of Numbers

The world of music finds harmony in mathematical bases. Rhythms, scales, and chords are all products of mathematical relationships. Musicians and composers employ these principles to create masterpieces that touch the soul. It’s a reminder that mathematics transcends the purely logical; it can evoke powerful emotions.

Barcodes

The barcodes that you see on products in stores use the binary system to represent product information.

QR codes

QR codes are a type of barcode that can be used to store a variety of information, such as website addresses, contact information, and even entire documents. QR codes also use the binary system.

Credit card numbers

Credit card numbers use a variety of mathematical bases, including the binary system, the decimal system, and the hexadecimal system. This helps to prevent credit card fraud.

Social Security numbers

Social Security numbers also use a variety of mathematical bases, including the binary system, the decimal system, and the hexadecimal system. This helps to protect the privacy of Social Security numbers.

Mathematical bases are an essential part of our modern world and they have many applications in a variety of fields.

The Creative Connection Between Math Base and Art

Mathematics and art are two seemingly disparate fields, yet they share a deep and fundamental connection. Math is the language of the universe, while art is a way of expressing the beauty and complexity of the world around us. One of the most intriguing intersections of these two disciplines is the concept of base.

Math bases can also be used to create art. For example, some artists use math base 10 to create fractals, which are complex patterns that are generated by repeating simple mathematical operations. Other artists use base 2 to create digital art, which is created using computers.

One of the most celebrated examples of art that uses base is the work of M.C. Escher. Escher was a Dutch artist who created mathematical woodcuts and lithographs. He was particularly fascinated by symmetry, and his work often explores different types of symmetrical patterns.

For example, Escher’s work “Metamorphosis I” depicts a series of fish that gradually transform into birds. The fish are arranged in a symmetrical pattern, and the transformation from fish to bird is achieved through a series of mathematical operations. Another example of Escher’s work that uses base is “Drawing Hands.” This work depicts two hands that are drawing each other. The hands are arranged in a symmetrical pattern, and the drawing is created through a series of recursive steps.

Metamorphosis I

Metamorphosis I

Escher’s work is just one example of the many ways that math base and art can be combined to create beautiful and inspiring works. The connection between math and art is a reminder that the world around us is full of patterns and beauty, and that math can be used to understand and appreciate these patterns.

Implications for Math Education

The intersection of math base and art can have a number of implications for math education. First, it can help to make math more engaging and accessible for students. When students see how math can be used to create art, they are more likely to be motivated to learn about it.

Second, it can help students to develop a deeper understanding of math concepts. When students apply math concepts to create art, they are forced to think about the concepts in a new way. This can help them to develop a deeper conceptual understanding of the material.

Finally, it can help students to develop their creative thinking skills. When students create art using math base, they are forced to come up with new and innovative ideas. This can help them to develop their creative thinking skills, which are essential for success in many different fields.

Overall, the connection between math base and art is a rich and complex one. It is a connection that can be used to make math more engaging, accessible, and meaningful for students.

Worksheets

Worksheet: Binary Basics

  1. Convert the following binary numbers to decimal: a) 1101 b) 10110 c) 111111
  2. Convert the following decimal numbers to binary: a) 25 b) 63 c) 128
  3. Add the following binary numbers: a) 1101 + 1011 b) 11100 + 1011 c) 110110 + 10101

Answers :

  1. a) 13, b) 22, c) 63
  2. a) 11001, b) 111111, c) 10000000
  3. a) 11000, b) 100111, c) 121011

Worksheet: Hexadecimal Conversion

  1. Convert the following hexadecimal numbers to decimal: a) 1A b) 2F c) 3D
  2. Convert the following decimal numbers to hexadecimal: a) 43 b) 255 c) 512
  3. Add the following hexadecimal numbers: a) 1A + 2F b) 3D + 21 c) 7B + 8A

Answers :

  1. a) 26, b) 47, c) 61
  2. a) 2B, b) FF, c) 200
  3. a) 49, b) 5E, c) 105

Worksheet : Base Conversion Challenge

  1. Convert the following binary numbers to hexadecimal: a) 11011010 b) 10101111 c) 111100001
  2. Convert the following hexadecimal numbers to binary: a) 1E3 b) 4A7 c) A1F
  3. Convert the following decimal numbers to hexadecimal: a) 128 b) 255 c) 512

Answers :

  1. a) DA, b) AF, c) 1E1
  2. a) 11100011, b) 10010100111, c) 10100001111
  3. a) 80, b) FF, c) 200

Worksheet : Operations in Different Bases

Question 1: Perform addition in base-5: a) 23_5 + 14_5 b) 40_5 + 12_5 c) 322_5 + 111_5

Answers:

a) 23_5 + 14_5 = 37_5

b) 40_5 + 12_5 = 52_5

c) 322_5 + 111_5 = 433_5

Question 2: Perform subtraction in base-8: a) 64_8 – 27_8 b) 53_8 – 25_8 c) 123_8 – 46_8

Answers:

a) 64_8 – 27_8 = 35_8

b) 53_8 – 25_8 = 26_8

c) 123_8 – 46_8 = 75_8

Question 3: Perform multiplication in base-6: a) 32_6 * 4_6 b) 15_6 * 3_6 c) 24_6 * 12_6

Answers:

a) 32_6 * 4_6 = 132_6

b) 15_6 * 3_6 = 43_6

c) 24_6 * 12_6 = 324_6

Question 4: Perform division in base-4: a) 120_4 ÷ 3_4 b) 301_4 ÷ 2_4 c) 223_4 ÷ 11_4

Answers:

a) 120_4 ÷ 3_4 = 40_4

b) 301_4 ÷ 2_4 = 131_4

c) 223_4 ÷ 11_4 = 20_4

Math Base Course cool math art

Math Base Course cool math art

From Math Base to Arithmetic course and exercises

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